Department of English & Modern Languages

Major in English Language Teaching (ELT) leading to a Bachelor of Arts
Foundation courses (including LFE) 39-41 credits
Core courses 42 credits
Major requierment 24 credits
Minor requirement 15 credits
Project/Teaching Practice/Seminar Paper 3 credits
Total degree requirement 123-125 credits

Core Courses

42 credits

The properties of language; animal and human language; the sounds of English; the sound patterns of English; words and word-formation processes; morphology; English syntax; English semantics and pragmatics; discourse analysis; language and the brain; language and society.
This course will focus on reading and analyzing works of poetry, prose, fiction and drama, in order to develop student appreciation and enjoyment of literature. Students will also be introduced to the use of rhetorical devices such as point of view, imagery, overstatement, understatement, metaphor, irony, allusion, etc. Students are expected to become familiar with technical terms such as plot, character, narrator, setting used to discuss works of literature.
This course will help students trace the development of the English language from its Anglo-Saxon roots to the present. What impact did the Norman Conquest have on English? Did the expansion of the British Empire have any impact on English? Why is American English different from British English? How have social changes affected the English language? Other topics to be focused on include English as a world language and the future of English. .
The aim of this course is to strengthen the knowledge of traditional grammar that students have acquired but also to introduce them to contemporary ways of looking at grammar. Items to be covered include language and meaning, linguistic forms and syntactic functions, clause structures, thematic and information structure of the clause, tense, and modality. Prerequisite: ELT 203.
This course will acquaint students with the theories of language and communication and the role of language in personal and social development. It will also trace the origins, development, acquisition and diversity of language as well as the nature and functions of symbolic systems. Other topics to be covered include phonology, morphology, syntax, orthography, sign language and semantics. Students will also be expected to be familiar with recent developments in linguistics. Prerequisites: ELT 201
The need for applied linguistics; The scope of applied linguistics; Linguistics versus applied linguistics; Language, culture and context; Language and Communication; Language and individual identity; Language in the contemporary world; Language variations; Standard language; native speaker of English; Language and gender; Language and Communication: Issues in ELT; ELT syllabuses; Error analysis and contrastive analysis. : ELT 201
Differences between acquisition and learning; Comparing first and second language acquisition - Types of comparison and contrast, The critical period hypothesis, Neurological considerations, psychomotor considerations, cognitive considerations, Affective considerations, Linguistic considerations; Strategies of second language acquisition; Acquisition and learning factors; Theories of second language acquisition; - different views; Communicative competence; Autonomy, individualisation, and self direction; The role of formal instruction in second language acquisition. Prerequisite: ELT 201.
Differences between approaches, methods, and strategies; A history of language teaching; Principles that underpin a method; The different methods: The oral approach and situational language teaching, The grammar-translation method, The direct method; The "Natural" approach, The audio-lingual method; The communicative approach; Comparing and evaluating methods. Prerequisite: ELT 201.
Traditional approaches, and current approaches to discourse; Types of discourse: Written, spoken, visual discourse; Language function and language use; Discourse as a product and as a process; Psycholinguistics in language use; Formal features of discourse; Cohesion and coherence in discourse; Fundamental concepts and methods in discourse analysis; Approaches to describe and explain structure and function of spoken, written and other types of discourse; Gender in discourse; Developing discourse skills; Practical application of discourse analysis; Discourse in the classroom; Discourse and the internet
Students will learn how to write a research paper using the library and on-line resources. How does one arrive at a workable thesis for a paper? How much should one try to include in a paper? What is meant by documentation and what are the different methods? What is plagiarism and how does one avoid it? This course includes one final research paper in addition to exams. Students will choose research topics relevant to their major. Prerequisite: ELT 201.
Overview of the development of English as a world language; Global and local varieties of English; Historical, social and political contexts of the expansion and development of English; Geographic and linguistic development of English, including pidgins and creoles; Variation across Englishes; Standard English and debates surrounding standard English; Internationalization and globalization of English; The role of 'non-native speaker' in the development of English
Introduction to the field: Definition, origin, types, and theoretical perspectives; Characteristics of the ESP learner, and the role of ESP learner; The linguistic features of ESP - Register analysis and applications, Discourse analysis and applications, Genre analysis and applications; ESP needs analysis; ESP course design; ESP materials preparation, evaluation and adaptation; ESP methodology; Assessment in ESP.
The purpose of this course is to introduce student writers to the workshop method of instruction, provide the students with an opportunity to produce written work in two genres for review by their peers, introduce student writers to an audience of serious readers, and provide students with the opportunity to improve their writing. In this cross-genre course the focus will be on those elements that make for vivid, effective writing across genres (especially fiction and poetry): significant detail, lyrical language and memorable image; inventive metaphor and simile; authentic voice, dialogue and characterization. Prerequisite: ENG 201.
Overview of types of provision for and purposes of teacher education and supervision; Effective techniques of teacher education and appropriate applications; Tasks for teacher training, ways of promoting collaboration, reflection on theory and practice, and group discussion; Analysing objectives of typical tasks; Designing appropriate tasks; Evaluating tasks; Experiential learning in teacher training and reflection on practice; Classroom observation; Microteaching; Practicum; Supervision processes and techniques; Assessment of practical teaching; Appraisal techniques; Mentoring and counseling techniques; Observation of teacher training course sessions.
Concentrations credits 27 credits
Analyzing teaching/learning context and isolating factors relevant to appropriate course planning; Needs analysis as a basis for course design; Setting and stating objectives for ELT courses; Course design models; Syllabus types and their implication for course design; Selecting the shape of the syllabus; Principles for selecting, grading and sequencing course content and learning materials, and tasks to implement the syllabus; Identifying factors relating to course evaluation. Prerequisite: ELT 201.
Principles of designing, selecting,, grading, and sequencing materials; Supplementing/adapting materials to syllabus types and contents; Special purpose material design; Self-direction material design; Student-generated materials; Role of materials in curriculum innovation and renewal.
This course will draw students' attention to computer-assisted language learning and teaching, and the application of some specialized computer software in the learning of language skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking. The theories on which such software is based will be elaborated on, with a brief introduction to the history of this new field. Prerequisite: ELT 201.
Communicative language teaching and grammatical competence - issues, problems, and compromises; Presenting new language - Analyzing, explaining, contrasting forms, showing meaning visually, showing meaning through a situation, using examples, simulation and role-play; Practising new language - Substitution drills, oral drills, information gap activities, games, oral composition, sentence writing, parallel writing. Prerequisite: ELT 201.
Surveying current trends in teaching pronunciation; Discussion of priorities for teaching and identifying problem areas due to mother-tongue interference; Ear training and auditory discrimination; Transcription as an aid to identifying difficulties and for dictionary use; Workshop tasks in analyzng "authentic texts"; Observation of dynamic and extra-linguistic features on videotapes; Classroom techniques for teaching the different elements of pronunciation. Prerequisite: ELT 201.
LISTENING COMPREHENSION: The meaning of listening comprehension ; Listening to English as a foreign language; Listening skills; Selecting and grading materials for appropriate classroom activities. SPEAKING SKILLS: Differences between spoken and written English; Production skills and Interaction skills; Learner strategies; Methodology for teaching speaking - different views; Oral practice activities; Classroom organization for interaction activities; Dealing with large classes. Prerequisite: ELT 201.
READING - Various processes within learning reading; Identifying various types of discourse structure in texts, and work out strategies for teaching learners to use them; Working out strategies for helping learners to read independently and extensively; Classroom approaches to the teaching of English reading. WRITING - The place of learning English writing as a second or a foreign language; Writing as process and product with reference to the teaching of discourse structure of English; The different genres of writing; Examination and evaluation of a range of methods and techniques for writing in English; Criteria for writing composition; Classroom management. Prerequisite: ELT 201.
The principles of learning vocabulary; The presentation of vocabulary and context-text exploration; the use of dictionaries; Vocabulary games and contests; Vocabulary errors; Comprehensible input and vocabulary accumulation; Vocabulary output and problems

ELT 416 Testing (3 credits)

Distinction between testing and evaluation; Approaches to test design - The psychometric structural era, the psycholinguistic-socio-linguistic era, the communicative paradigm; Basic considerations in test design - validity, reliability, efficiency, and backwash effects; Test construction- test design, test development, operation, monitoring; Test methods for reading, writing, listening, and speaking; Multi-mode testing; Interactive testing. Prerequisite: ELT 201.

Minor in Literature

Minor in Literature -15 Credits
This course will focus on reading and analyzing works of poetry, prose, fiction and drama, in order to develop student appreciation and enjoyment of literature. Students will also be introduced to the use of literary features such as point of view, imagery, overstatement, understatement, metaphor, irony, allusion, etc. Students are expected to become familiar with technical terms such as plot, character, narrator, setting used to discuss works of literature.
This course will familiarize students with the major genres of poetry as well as with major English and American poets. Students will be expected to appreciate and analyze poetry using the technical terms they have acquired earlier. What rhetorical and linguistic devices do poets use to convey their themes? What are the advantages and/or the disadvantages of free verse versus more formally structured poetry? How important is the poet's "message" for a poem? Prerequisite: ENG 201.
This course focuses on both fiction as well as non-fiction. Students will be expected to analyze different types of prose. What devices do writers use to convey their themes? How does "literary" prose differ from journalistic prose? Students will be expected to read one novel for this course. Prerequisite: ENG 201
This course will give students an overview of the gradual development of drama of diverse types starting with a Greek classic to the present time. Students will be expected to be familiar with technical terms necessary to write about drama such as character, plot, setting etc. Prerequisite: ENG 201.
This course will familiarize students with the major genres of poetry as well as with major English and American poets. Students will be expected to appreciate and analyze poetry using the technical terms they have acquired earlier. What rhetorical and linguistic devices do poets use to convey their themes? What are the advantages and/or the disadvantages of free verse versus more formally structured poetry? How important is the poet's "message" for a poem? Prerequisite: ENG 201.
This survey course includes English texts in the genres of poetry and prose from the medieval period to the end of the 18th century and the rise of the novel. Students will be expected to read at least two of the novels offered. Prerequisite: ENG 201.
This survey course includes Victorian texts in the genres of poetry and prose. How did the Victorians differ from the Romantics who preceded them? What influence did the rise of empire have upon Victorian writing? Students will be expected to read at least two of
This survey course includes English texts in the genres of poetry, prose and drama during the twentieth century. Students will be expected to be familiar with the historical and political changes that marked the rise of modernism. Students will be expected to read at least three of the novels in the syllabus. Prerequisite: ENG 201, ENG 306, ENG 312
This survey course includes American writings from the early Puritans to the mid-19th century. How did American writers formulate an "American" self and nation in the 19th century? Prerequisite: ENG 201
This survey course includes American writings from the late19th century to the present. How has American writing changed over the period? A minimum of six texts will be taught, including two novels. Prerequisite: ENG 201
This course is designed to look closely at Shakespeare’s plays in the context of his times and his contemporaries. What did Shakespeare learn from his contemporaries and how did he differ from them? Prerequisite: ENG 201, ENG 305
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This course includes writings in English from countries other than the UK and the US to give students an exposure to the range of writing in English. Prerequisite: ENG 201
This course includes a study of texts by women authors as well as texts by male authors that focus on women. Is there a difference between men's writings and women's writings as some critics have suggested? Prerequisite: ENG 201

Minor in Linguistics

Minor in Linguistics -15 Credits
The properties of language; animal and human language; the sounds of English; the sound patterns of English; words and word-formation processes; morphology; English syntax; English semantics and pragmatics; discourse analysis; language and the brain; language and society.
This course will acquaint students with the theories of language and communication and the role of language in personal and social development. It will also trace the origins, development, acquisition and diversity of language as well as the nature and functions of symbolic systems. Other topics to be covered include phonology, morphology, syntax, orthography, sign language and semantics. Students will also be expected to be familiar with recent developments in linguistics.
An introduction to phonetics and phonology; air stream mechanism; sound segments: (a) consonants: places of articulation, manner of articulation, voicing, aspiration (b) vowels: cardinal vowels, tongue position and lip rounding, length and quality (c) English vowels: pure vowels and diphthongs. Segmental phonology: phonemes, allophones, minimal pairs; supra-segmental phonology: syllables, stress, intonation; aspects of connected speech: contractions, weak forms, linking, assimilation, and elision; various accents in English; differentiation between sound and structure; morphophonology. Prerequisite: ENG 211
An introduction to morphology and lexicology; morphemes: (a) free morphemes: lexical morphemes, functional morphemes (b) bound morphemes: prefixes, suffixes, infixes, circumfixes; morphological analysis; the lexicon: more than words; lexis and syntax; lexis and morphology; lexical partnerships; lexis and meaning; lexis, phonology and orthography; lexis and social context; lexical process and change; acquiring and processing lexis; the lexicon: a growth area. Prerequisite: ENG 201

LIN 313 Syntax (3 credits)

An introduction to the sentence structure; types of grammar: traditional grammar, prescriptive grammar, descriptive grammar, generative grammar; grammar and the mind; "hidden" rules of language; syntactic categories; structural ambiguity; sentence structure and phrase structure rules; structure by means of tree diagrams. Prerequisites:

LIN 314 Semantics (3 credits)

An introduction to the study of linguistic meaning; the meaning of semantics; descriptive social and expressive meaning; lexical semantics: basic concepts; semantic properties; semantic relationship among linguistic units; cognitive semantics; semantics and lexicography; semantic change; semantics and language comparison; semantics and grammar; compositional semantics; meaning and context; semantics and literature. Prerequisites: ELT 201, ENG 301.
An introduction to sociolinguistics; dialects: education, occupation, social class, age, sex, culture, and ethnic background, idiolects; language types: standard, formal and informal; loan words, pidgins, and creoles; linguistic determinism: the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis; language shift, endangerment, and death; code switching and code mixing; diglossia; major varieties of English. Prerequisites: ELT 201, ENG 301.
An introduction to psycholinguistics; language and the brain; parts of the brain; brain and language acquisition; theories of first language acquisition; theories of second language acquisition; comprehension; language production; language mistakes and errors; dissolution: neurolinguistics and language loss, speech and language disorders. Prerequisite: ELT 201
An introduction to historical linguistics; language evolution; language variation and change; principles of comparative linguistics; genetic relationships between languages; language change: phonetic, phonological, morphological and syntactic change; lexical and semantic change; the role of language and dialect contact; comparative and internal reconstruction; typological and genetic classification of languages. Prerequisites: ELT 201, LIN 311, LIN 312

Minor in ELT

Minor in ELT -15 Credits
The properties of language; animal and human language; the sounds of English; the sound patterns of English; words and word-formation processes; morphology; English syntax; English semantics and pragmatics; discourse analysis; language and the brain; language and society.
Differences between approaches, methods, and strategies; A history of language teaching; Principles that underpin a method; The different methods: The oral approach and situational language teaching, The grammar-translation method, The direct method; The "Natural" approach, The audio-lingual method; The communicative approach; Comparing and evaluating methods.
Differences between acquisition and learning; Comparing first and second language acquisition - Types of comparison and contrast, The critical period hypothesis, Neurological considerations, psychomotor considerations, cognitive considerations, Affective considerations, Linguistic considerations; Strategies of second language acquisition; Acquisition and learning factors; Theories of second language acquisition; - different views; Communicative competence; Autonomy, individualisation, and self direction; The role of formal instruction in second language acquisition.
Analyzing teaching/learning context and isolating factors relevant to appropriate course planning; Needs analysis as a basis for course design; Setting and stating objectives for ELT courses; Course design models; Syllabus types and their implication for course design; Selecting the shape of the syllabus; Principles for selecting, grading and sequencing course content and learning materials, and tasks to implement the syllabus; Identifying factors relating to course evaluation.
Communicative language teaching and grammatical competence - issues, problems, and compromises; Presenting new language - Analyzing, explaining, contrasting forms, showing meaning visually, showing meaning through a situation, using examples, simulation and role-play; Practising new language - Substitution drills, oral drills, information gap activities, games, oral composition, sentence writing, parallel writing. Prerequisite: ELT 201.
READING - Various processes within learning reading; Identifying various types of discourse structure in texts, and work out strategies for teaching learners to use them; Working out strategies for helping learners to read independently and extensively; Classroom approaches to the teaching of English reading. WRITING - The place of learning English writing as a second or a foreign language; Writing as process and product with reference to the teaching of discourse structure of English; The different genres of writing; Examination and evaluation of a range of methods and techniques for writing in English; Criteria for writing composition; Classroom management.

ELT 414 Testing (3 credits)

Distinction between testing and evaluation; Approaches to test design - The psychometric structural era, the psycholinguistic-socio-linguistic era, the communicative paradigm; Basic considerations in test design - validity, reliability, efficiency, and backwash effects; Test construction- test design, test development, operation, monitoring; Test methods for reading, writing, listening, and speaking; Multi-mode testing; Interactive testing.

The Department also offers foundation courses (See under Foundation Courses at SLASS)



Contact Us

Department of English
Room No: 7001
Phone: +88-02-8431645-53
Ext: 2415
Email: nadia@iub.edu.bd