Department

of

Social Science

and Humanities

SLASS Search

Program 1: For 4 semesters

Program 2: For 6 semesters

Master’s Thesis

All courses are of 3 credits, meaning 3 hours of class-room teaching per week. The courses that are considered as basic to the Development Studies and form its core are called here as “Core Courses”. All students must register for the core courses. The studies of development is also divided into various areas and the courses in these are called here as “Area Courses”. Besides these there is also scope for the students to specialize in some particular area. For this there are a number of courses offered by the programs and these are called here as “Specialization Courses”. Note that only a selected number of Area and Specialization courses may be offered during any particular semester.

Core and Area Courses shall be taught as seminar courses in which every student shall be expected to contribute.

 

Total Credits = 39

  • Core Courses                           12 Credits
  • Area Courses                           9 Credits
  • Specialized Area Courses          9 Credits
  • Thesis                                      9 Credits

or

  • 9 additional credits from the same/other Specialized areas or Area courses

 

Core Courses: (4x3) = 12

            DST 501 Introduction to Development Studies

            DST 502 Development Theories and Debates

            DST 503 Development Economics

            DST 504 Research Methods

 

Area Courses (3x3) = 9 (as offered) 

            DST 602 Rural Development

            DST 603 Poverty and Social Inequality

            DST 604 Environment and Development

            DST 611 Gender Issues and Development

            DST 612 Communication for Development

            DST 613 Governance and Development

            DST 615 Globalization and Development

            DST 652 NGO and Development

 

 

Specialized Area Courses (Any one area) (3x3) = 9 (as offered)

 

A. Poverty and Gender Development

            DST 621 Gender Relations, Planning and Development

            DST 622 Gender, State and Social Policy

            DST 623 Women, Work and Education

            DST 624 Microfinance and Empowerment*

            DST 625 Rural Institutions and Gender Development*

 

B. Rural Development and Microfinance

            DST 631 Rural Livelihoods Issues and Problems

            DST 632 Policy, Programs and Projects

            DST 633 Microfinance and Development Management

            DST 624 Microfinance and Empowerment*

            DST 625 Rural Institutions and Gender Development*

 

C. International Relations and Development

            DST 641 International Politics and Development

            DST 642 International Organizations and Development

            DST 643 International Reconstruction and Development

            DST 644 Diaspora and Development

 

D. Population, Migration and Urbanization

            DST 605 Population and Development

DST 614 Urbanization and Development

            DST 671 Migration and Development

            DST 674 Growth of Cities and Social Change in Asia                       

*Course is optional for both ‘Poverty and Gender Development’ & ‘Rural Development and Microfinance’ Specialized Area choices.

 

DST  501   Introduction to Development Studies

Development concepts and debates; Civil Society; State and Market; Economic Development as Modern Structural Transformation; Underdevelopment; Dependence; Global inequality and cultural difference; Agricultural Transformation; Rural Society and Traditional Culture; The question of Population pressure; Poverty: Measures, Causes, Trends, and Alleviation; Rational Choice Theory; Transparency; Poverty Rights and Governance and Institutions; Women; Gender and Development; States and Politics; Critical Alternatives in development.

DST  502   Development Theories and Debates

Theories of social change and paradigm shifts. Modernization and economic growth theories – Rostow, Parsons, Smellser; Dependency theories- Dos Santos, Sunkel, Amin, Unequal exchange; Frank and the development of underdevelopment, Neo-Marxian theories of development; World System theory of Wallerstein. Neo-colonialism and post-colonial economies; Globalization.

DST  503   Development and Economics

Development and Social System; Technological and Institutional Innovations; Political Market and Dependency; Economic Growth and Structural Change; Investment, Saving and Prices; Human Capital, Population Growth, Natural Resources and Foods;  Science-Based Agriculture, Green Revolution, Natural Resource Slack; Capital Accumulation (Adam Smith, Kuznets, Marx, Ricardo); Theory and Policies (Balanced Growth, Harrod-Domar Model, Low-equilibrium Trap, etc.); Neoclassical Production Function and Growth Accounting Test; Income Distribution and Inequality; Economic Stagnation, Environmental Problems, GDP and GNP and Poverty; Market and State (Market and Government Failure, Ricardo vs. Listian Trap, Import-substitution industrialization policy; Ideology and Populism); New paradigm (Structural Adjustment, Washington Consensus and East Asian Model); Community (Prisoner Dilemma, Social Capital, Private and Public Goods, Common Property Resources, Landlord-Tenant Relations).

DST 504 Research Methods

Philosophy of Science and Social Sciences, Development Paradigm and Discourse Analysis;  Quantitative methods (research design, descriptive measures – means, median, mode, variance  variables and hypotheses, measurements and its levels; reliability and validity; index construction; scales and social indicators, random assignments, sampling, survey methods, organizing and analyzing quantitative data analysis); Qualitative method (participant-observation, observation of participation, ethnography, reflexivity, reflexive ethnography, critical ethnography, structural-functionalism, domain analysis, knowledge system, etic-emic, etc.).   Development research (applied research; summative evaluation; formative evaluations; action research; farming and market research; mixed methodology techniques; participatory research; gender and feminist research; critical research; social impact assessment (SIA) and environmental impact assessment (EIA).

 

Area Courses (3x3) = 9 (as offered)

 

DST 602 Rural Development

Different theories of Rural Development and its application in Bangladesh; Rural marginalization and development paradigm;  agricultural restructuring; resource management; depopulation and out-migration; rural poverty; women and gender; community-based and grass-roots development strategies; development approaches (micro-credit, education, health, social mobilization, human rights, etc.);  Rural-Urban Connectivity and Global labor market,  Transformation of Rural Society and Market Question.

DST  603     Poverty and Social Inequality (Compulsory for Poverty and Rural Dev.)

The objective of the course is to equip the students with an analytical understanding of the different approaches to defining and assessing poverty and social inequality. It examines different theoretical approaches to the analysis of poverty and inequality. Concepts and measurement of poverty and inequality are treated in depth, focusing on the mutual relationship between poverty and social inequality. The course also looks at the impact of economic growth and social development on poverty and social inequality and vice versa. Current policy debates, including the origins and implementation of national Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPs), are also looked into.

DST  604     Environment and Development

Major global and national environmental issues; Sustainable Development and Economic Growth; Importance of People’s Participation; Conservation and Enhancement of Ecosystem; Carrying Capacity; Development and Human Health; Population pressure, Poverty and Environment; Environmental Conventions and Laws

DST 611 Gender Issues and Development

This course situates the study of gender and development in the context of the social sciences, while addressing the challenges of policy-making and implementation. To do this it brings together experts from a range of academic disciplines and policy experiences. Toipcs covered include: Empowerment and Conscientization of Women;  Gender and Planning process; Women and Development (WAD); Women in Development (WID); Gender, Environment and Development (GED); Gender and Development (GAD); Patriarchy and Misogyny; Feminism

DST 612 Communication for Development

The course is designed with the purpose of guiding how practitioners work with communities, development partners and programme staff. The core principles are based on the human rights based approach to programming, particularly on the rights to information, communication and participation as enshrined, for example, in the Convention on the Rights of the Child. C4D has been accepted by the United Nations system as a systematic, planned and evidence-informed strategic process to promote positive and measurable individual behaviour and social change that is integral to all development programmes.

DST 613 Governance and Development

This course introduces the students to the basic concepts and issues associated with governance and how it affects and is affected by development. Major topics include the nature and role of the state; the concept of ‘governance’ and its role in development; democratization and participation; social and political movements; civil society, corruption; development advocacy; empowerment and promotion of human rights. Students are also introduced to various aspects of current thinking about governance reform

DST 615 Globalization and Development

This course seeks to understand the ongoing process of globalization in terms of its nature and possible consequences. It looks into issues like market economy, free trade and the World Trade Organization; movement of labour and capital across borders; multinational and transnational corporations and organizations; the dwindling role of the nation-state and state boundaries and identities; the “new global ruling class”, social inequalities and the redundancy of the poor; McDonaldization of the world; global-local differences and resistance to globalization.

DST 652 NGO and Development

NGOs and different theories; NGO and Donors; NGO and Government; NGO and Business; NGO and Civil Society; NGO, State and Donor Partnership; Partnership and Interface Management; Development agencies (New Roles and Relevance); NGO and Village Community; Organization Development and Group Formation; Organization and Management of Microcredit and Finance; Organization and Health Management  (Family Planning and Reproductive Health) Programs; Organization and management of Education Programs; Social Mobilization and Empowerment; Grassroots Democracy, Embankments (Cross Border and Internal) and Flood Control;  Ecology of Sunderban; Natural Water Master Plan of 2002.

 

Specialized Area Courses (Any one area) (3x3) = 9 (as offered)

A. Poverty and Gender Development

 

DST 621 Gender Relations, Planning and Development

Empowerment and Conscientization of Women;  Gender and Planning process; Women and Development (WAD); Women in Development (WID); Gender, Environment and Development (GED); Gender and Development (GAD); Patriarchy and Misogyny; Feminism; Women (Nature versus Nurture); Gender (Class versus Culture); Religion and Women;  Household and Gender; Human Rights and Gender.  Gender Programs and Development Organizations; Organizational Culture and Gender

DST 622 Gender, State and Social Policy

Studying the welfare state, Gendering the welfare state, Understanding social policy,   gendering social policy, Women and children in the United States, the liberal welfare state , The feminization of poverty, Social Policies, International Comparisons with Europe, Examples from Eastern Europe, Examples from Less developed countries.

DST 623 Women, Work and Education

Demonstrate a basic understanding of labor markets and some critiques of traditional economics; demonstrate an understanding of the following concepts: feminism, patriarchy, race, class, gender, double day, domestic labor, employment equity, pay equity, sweatshop and use these concepts to develop an analysis of women's work worldwide; identify and critically analyze women's gains in the Canadian labor market and how these have been accomplished historically;  demonstrate awareness of women's workplace rights identify and critically evaluate some strategies used to decrease gender inequity and discrimination; analyze the current state of women's rights and working conditions in a number of different countries, using some of the concepts and tools developed in the course;  discuss and analyze likely future trends for women's work; identify personal and collective strategies to take as a "toolkit" into the workplace

DST 624 Microfinance and Empowerment*

The Global Context of Microfinance; The Institutional Basis; Basic Financial Management; Microfinance Product; Microinsurance; Gender and Microfinance; Poverty, Gender and Microfinance; Case Analysis: Asia, Africa, Latin America, Microfinance: Tyranny.

DST 625 Rural Institutions and Gender Development*

Gender Issues in Global Perspectives; Violence against Women – I; Violence against Women II; Women’s Health in the Developing World; Women’s Health in the Developing World; Women, Globalization, and Global Flights; Gender and the Global Challenge of AIDS – I; Gender and the Global Challenge of AIDS – II; Women’s Basic Education; Women, Higher Education and Career Tracks; Women in Politics and Public Decision Making I; Women in Politics and Public Decision Making II. 

 

B. Rural Development and Microfinance

 

DST 631 Rural Livelihoods Issues and Problems        

The course focuses on the various issues and problems associated with rural development in the third world countries like Bangladesh. The course looks at the underlying structural causes of rural marginalization and the changes in the rural development paradigms. Particular attention is given to the study of the impact of urbanization and globalization on rural society and its economy, politics and environment. The issues discussed will include problems of agricultural restructuring, sustainable resource management, depopulation and out-migration, rural poverty; women in rural development, community-based and grass-roots development strategies, the role of development NGO's and micro-credit on rural development; sustainable rural development strategies

DST 632 Policy, Programs and Projects

Project Preparation and Proposal Development; Problem Analysis, Objective Formulation and Project Design; Pre-Feasibility and Feasibility; Relevance of the Project; The Macroeconomic, Cultural Context and Policies of Projects; Project Efficiency; Evaluation and Monitoring; Project Effectiveness; Project Effect and Impact; Economic and Financial Management; Sustainability and Replicability.  Logical Framework Approach (stakeholder/participation analysis, problem analysis, objective analysis, indicator and strategy analyses).  

DST 633 Microfinance and Development Management

State of the Art in Microfinance; Micro-credit to Microfinance; Different Schools of Thoughts and Micro-Finance Discourse; Money (Money and its philosophy; The history and Origin of money and credit in South Asian History; Economic and Anthropological definition of Money, Microcredit, Credit and Savings; Credit, Poor and Poverty Alleviation; Informal credit market).  Different Approaches (MFI Policy Environment; Credit, Capital Accumulation and Market; Maximalist vs. Minimalist; Traditional Saving Methods of Poor and Credit Policies; ROSCA, etc); Credit, Saving and Social Change; Credit plus: health, empowerment, education, social mobilization, human rights, etc.; Responding Critical Evaluation (Credit and Exploitation; MFI Credit and Rural Power Structure; Moral and Immoral Money, Religion and Microcredit; Ethics).  Globalization and Micro-credit Movement.

DST 624 Microfinance and Empowerment*

The Global Context of Microfinance; The Institutional Basis; Basic Financial Management; Microfinance Product; Microinsurance; Gender and Microfinance; Poverty, Gender and Microfinance; Case Analysis: Asia, Africa, Latin America, Microfinance: Tyranny.

DST 625 Rural Institutions and Gender Development*

Gender Issues in Global Perspectives; Violence against Women – I; Violence against Women II; Women’s Health in the Developing World; Women’s Health in the Developing World; Women, Globalization, and Global Flights; Gender and the Global Challenge of AIDS – I; Gender and the Global Challenge of AIDS – II; Women’s Basic Education; Women, Higher Education and Career Tracks; Women in Politics and Public Decision Making I; Women in Politics and Public Decision Making II. 

 

C. International Relations and Development

 

DST 641 International Politics and Development

Power and Statecraft; Foreign Policy Decision Making; The Causes and Prevention of International Conflict; Weapons of Mass Destruction; Conventional Weapons Proliferation; Economic Globalisation; Cultural Globalisation; Global Challenges: Migration, Disease, Environment; The United Nations System and Global Governance; International Integration and the European Union; International Law; Inequality, Poverty and Development in North-South Relations; Theoretical Perspectives of International Politics

DST 642 International Organizations and Development

Four dimensions of international business and trade- International trade theory, government influence on the world trade pattern, the International Monetary System, origin Exchange Market, the effects of cultural differences in world trade and various forms of international business organizations and alliances. Methods used in trade and transacting business (goods and services) across national boundaries, such as exporting, direct investment, joint ventures, and trade finance. Role and impact of international development organizations such as the United Nations and its affiliates (the World Bank group, the IMF and the WTO) on trade patterns and international business transactions; role and impact of regional development alliances such as NAFTA, the EU, EFTA and the Pacific Rim will be discussed. My approach for this course is an interdisciplinary and action oriented one.

DST 643 International Reconstruction and Development

Locating Issues of Reconstruction; Post-Conflict Reconstruction Challenges; NGOs, Peace-building and Reconstruction; Conflict Terminations; Peace Processes; Relief to Reconstruction: Theories, Rhetoric and Practices; The Peace-building and Post-war Reconstruction Processes; Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration of Former Combatants, Case Story Analysis; Reflections and Prodpects.  

DST 644 Diaspora and Development

Approaches to International Migration; The Transnational Perspective in Migration Research (1): Transnational Social Spaces; The Transnational Perspective in Migration Research (2): Implications; Migrant Transnational Politics and State Responses; Transnationalization, Immigrant Integration and Diaspora Formation; Transnational Social Formations and Development; Case Studies 1: Transnational Communities and Development.

 

D. Population, Migration and Urbanization

 

DST 605 Population and Development

This course introduces you to population issues, concepts, theories and methods by encompassing the entire field of demography, including principle and practice. It offers an overview of various aspects of demographic growth and transition relating to changes in health and mortality, fertility, migration, age structure, urbanization, family and household structure. This course also examines the relations between population and development and their potential consequences from a sociological, economic and geographical perspective. Other topics include global variation in population size and growth, various demographic perspectives and their modern implications, environmental impacts, and population policy.

DST 614 Urbanization and Development

This course examines the origins, types, and characteristics of cities in less developed countries and how they relate to the development process of the country vis-à-vis the world economy. It focuses on urban growth and the rise of mega cities in the Third World and attempts an analysis of contemporary urban systems in the Third World in terms of the demographic patterns, rural urban migration, the social and political structure of large cities, the urban poor, squatters, slums and shantytowns; the composition and behavior of urban elites; housing and transportation; urban economy and the informal sector; land use and urban planning.

DST 671 Migration and Development

This course is designed to give the students the necessary analytical skills to understand demographic and population dynamics of the contemporary world with a special focus on the Developing World. First we discuss the fundamental components of population, dynamics of demography and current trends in global population growth. Second, we evaluate the theoretical bases of the 'population debate', and examine the applicability of the main theories of population to different regional situations in the Developing World. Third, we focus on fertility issues. We discuss the issues of contraceptive revolution and its impact on the structure of the population pyramids in Developing countries. Fourth, we will examine the relationship between population and development and analyze the causes and effects of human migration flows, both internal and international, including refugee and migrant workers. Fifth, we will turn our attention to the debate on population and the environment. Finally, we examine the linkages between Developing and Developed countries on the question of population policy and sustainable development.

DST 674 Growth of Cities and Social Change in Asia

Compare and contrast the major features of the civilizations studied, Organize learned materials in order to present coherent arguments that explain major differences between patterns of governance and belief systems found in the various cultural zones studied, Identify fundamental economic relationships between civilizations based on international trading systems; Compare the impact of colonialism, imperialism, independence and nationalistic movements on different world cultures; Describe the dominant patterns of interactions between civilizations in trade, cultural exchange and dominance, technology transfer, travel, migration, colonization and military conflict;  Describe and explain the emergence of competitive vs. centralized economies in specific cultural or governmental conditions; Explain social relationships and structures in different cultural and geographic settings; Compare social and political characteristics in different cultural and geographic settings.

 

DST 699 Master's Thesis

The Master’s Thesis shall be an original work researched and written by the student on a topic covered by the courses taught in the programme. The thesis will be worked out under the supervision of a senior IUB faculty member (Supervisor) with expertise in the field of research and to be chosen by the student. The student, with the approval of the supervisor, shall choose a topic for research by the end of the second term (third term for programme 2) and write and defend a proposal by the end of the third term (fifth term for programme 2). The researching and writing of the thesis must follow a recognized methodology and must be completed by the end of the fourth term (sixth term for programme 2) and defended within one month after that in a public defence.

The total length of the thesis shall be at least 75 pages (on A4 size 80gm offset paper with proper margins, typed with double space and 12 pt. Times New Roman fonts) or about 18,000 words. It must be bound in hard covers. The front cover should be sober and in single colour and shall contain the title of the thesis on the top in large fonts, the name and identity number of the student in smaller fonts in the middle of the page. The bottom of the page shall contain  the words “Master’s Thesis” and below this the phrase “Submitted to the School of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, Independent University, Bangladesh in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the MSS degree in Development Studies” in smaller fonts.  Six copies of the thesis must be submitted to the School. The School will retain the original for records and send four copies to the members of the defence committee and one copy to the IUB Library.  In case of revisions (see below) five copies of the revised version must be submitted to the School. The School will then send three copies to the examiners, one to the IUB Library and retain the original for records.

The examination of the Thesis will be done by the Examination Committee comprising of the Supervisor and two other experts in the field, one of whom must be from outside the IUB. The examiners shall be selected by the Supervisor in consultation with the Dean, SLASS, prior to the proposal defence. The proposal shall be defended before the examination committee.  IUB faculty members and graduate students may be invited to participate in the proposal defence. 

The Defence of the Thesis shall be done in public with the Dean, SLASS, as the Chair. In case the Dean, SLASS, happens to be the Supervisor, the defence shall be chaired by the Dean of another School.  The other members of the Defence Committee shall be the three examiners. The Vice Chancellor and the Pro-Vice Chancellor may be invited to sit in but they will be non-voting members. The Supervisor, in consultation with the Defence Committee members, shall select a date for defence within one month after submission of the thesis. The School will organize the defence and invite the members of the Defence Committee and the Vice Chancellor and the Pro-Vice Chancellor to the defence. Other faculty members and graduate students can attend but may not participate in the proceedings. The date, time and the place of the defence shall be made public through the CITS by the School.

The Defence shall run for at least one hour, of which fifteen minutes shall be given at the outset to the student to present the thesis. This will be followed by at least 30 minutes of questions (by the members of the Defense Committee) and answers (by the student) at the end of which the Defence Committee shall meet in camera to finalize their judgment of the thesis. The judgment will be made known to the student immediately thereafter. The Thesis shall be judged unanimously as 1. Pass, 2. Pass with specified revisions to be made, and completed within next one month and submitted to the School. 3. Fail. In case of revisions the examination committee must be satisfied with the changes made to pass the thesis. .

 

 

 

                       

*Course is optional for both ‘Poverty and Gender Development’ & ‘Rural Development and Microfinance’ Specialized Area choices.